Chapter 9, Block 33

This block starts of with the basics of cutting geometrics. It can sometimes be trickier to make these cuts than with a regular motif covered print, since you'll be able to quickly see if your cut lines aren't straight or are just a bit wonky. Make sure to carefully consider where you cut before you make your move!

Our friend Jessee of Art School Dropout created this striking black, white and multi block!

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Chapter 8, Block 31

This block is a little bit of a breather between some more complicated cutting. Large scale one-way prints are super fun to buy and stash, but they're often hard to use in blocks. This one is designed to give you a big block space to let your favorite motif shine. Enhance it with an interesting border or some complementary fabrics.

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Chapter 8, Block 30

Two way prints can be tricky to add to blocks, since you'll usually end up cutting off a motif design, which could make your block distracting. By carefully selecting which block sections your two-way prints will fill, you can eliminate some of that distraction.

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Jess from Elven Garden Quilts made this beautiful block with perfectly matched colors to highlight the tiger motif!

Jess from Elven Garden Quilts made this beautiful block with perfectly matched colors to highlight the tiger motif!

Chapter 8, Block 29

This block shows how you can best work with one-way designs to create a smooth flow through your block, just by playing with directionality. It can be tricky to get the balance between background and your focal fabrics right, so take some time and try out different options! Also make sure you're taking care when cutting your Quarter-Square-Triangle units, so your directionality stays consistent!

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Chapter 7, Block 28

As you may have discovered, sometimes even with the best-laid plans it can be hard to isolate tossed prints. That's why we're so pleased to share Guest Star Latifah Saafir's trick on isolating designs. By creating your own background, you can simplify your block design and eliminate distracting backgrounds! Plus, it's FUN!

We love how Latifah used her new fabric collection, Double Dutch, to highlight her isolation technique! Her fabrics are graphic and absolutely stunning together, and they'll be in stores soon, so keep your eye out! 

We love how Latifah used her new fabric collection, Double Dutch, to highlight her isolation technique! Her fabrics are graphic and absolutely stunning together, and they'll be in stores soon, so keep your eye out! 

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Chapter 7, Block 27

Sometimes, if you want to create a one-way design with a tossed print, you'll need to force directionality. This is when you may cut off-grain to get the design to face one direction. It's a little tricky, so press gently so you don't stretch your fabric!

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Chapter 7, Block 26

This block teaches you how to find a focal in a tossed print. Sometimes it might seems like it's impossible to isolate just one motif in a tossed print, but by looking for a repeating design in other parts of the fabric, you're sometimes able to get just what you want, without a lot of extra pieces!

We love how Monica of Happy Zombie fussy cut her sweet little doggy print, inspired by her very own four-legged-friend!

We love how Monica of Happy Zombie fussy cut her sweet little doggy print, inspired by her very own four-legged-friend!

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Chapter 7, Block 25

This block covers cutting basics for tossed prints. While a tossed print may look like you can cut anywhere and still achieve a cute fussy cut, it's important to take just a smidge of extra time to make sure you're isolating the motif you want!

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Chapter 6, Block 24

This block is all about complementary directionality in Half-Square-Triangles. This can be a tricky concept since there are so many places where patterns will cross. It's super important to pick the right fabric that won't be too distracting, or look like you made excessive cutting errors. When this is done effectively it creates a dynamic block with a continuous flow.

We love how Giuseppe of Giucy_Giuce used the isolation technique to achieve the full effect of this block!

We love how Giuseppe of Giucy_Giuce used the isolation technique to achieve the full effect of this block!

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Chapter 6, Block 23

Sometimes it can be hard to put multiple focal fabrics together in one finished piece. This block gives you the chance to test out some different focal motifs together by exploring color placement, theme, etc. 

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Chapter 6, Block 22

Blcok 22 is about cutting different sizes of motifs from the same print. The goal is to find a fabric you love that has both a large focal motif, as well as small focals you might otherwise overlook. By isolating the small designs apart from the large designs, you shift the focus to the other elements in the fabric!

We love how Janice of Better off Thread used the kitty cat in the center with the butterflies, birds, fish and mice as secondary focals!

We love how Janice of Better off Thread used the kitty cat in the center with the butterflies, birds, fish and mice as secondary focals!

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TIP: If you're working with a directional background, when you cut your (1) 4-1/2" square of fabric B (background), you'll need to cut it on the bias to make sure the directionality flows through the block. Otherwise, those sections will not have the same directionality in the final block.

TIP: If you're working with a directional background, when you cut your (1) 4-1/2" square of fabric B (background), you'll need to cut it on the bias to make sure the directionality flows through the block. Otherwise, those sections will not have the same directionality in the final block.

Chapter 6, Block 21

Block 21 is all about sizing to fit and working with scale. The challenge we present here is to find a similar motif in three different sizes, then use the different sized borders in the block to play with that scale.

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